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Building and boundary Disputes Solicitors-East London

Housing Disrepair

Disputes involving property repairs can be a nightmare for landlords and tenants. Our expert solicitors can advise social housing tenants and tenants in the private rental sector on taking action against a landlord for disrepair under Section 604 of the Housing Act 1985 (amended by the Local Government and Housing Act 1989).

Under the Housing Act, landlords have a legal duty to ensure that properties they rent out are fit for human habitation and Under Section 11 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985, landlords have a legal duty to keep properties they rent out in a reasonable state of repair and also in a safe condition.

Landlords have the responsibility to,

  • Keep in repair the structure and exterior of the dwelling, including drains, gutters and external pipes,
  • Keep in repair and proper working order the installations in the dwelling for the supply of water, gas, electricity and for sanitation (including basins, sinks, baths and sanitary conveniences but not other fixtures, fittings and appliances, and
  • Keep in repair and proper working order the installation in the dwelling for space heating and heating water.
  • Keep in repair the interior of the property from Damp and Mould.

If you’re renting privately, through a Housing Association or Council, your landlord has responsibility for most major repairs.

Your landlord is always responsible for repairs to:

  • the property’s structure and exterior
  • basins, sinks, baths and other sanitary fittings including pipes and drains
  • heating and hot water
  • gas appliances, pipes, flues and ventilation
  • electrical wiring
  • any damage they cause by attempting repairs

If your home is damp, your landlord might not necessarily be responsible as it depends on what’s caused it and the type of damp. However if you think the landlord is responsible and not doing anything to fix it then contact Legend Solicitors.

As a tenant, you’re responsible for minor fixes and repairs, such as light bulbs and fuses. You’re also responsible for fixing any damage you’ve caused by accident or attempting repairs. You should only carry out repairs if the tenancy agreement says you can. You can’t be forced to do repairs that are your landlord’s responsibility.

Your tenancy agreement or statement of terms might give you extra rights, so it's a good idea to check your paperwork. If English is not your first language, our multi-lingual expert Legal team at Legend Solicitors can assist you in knowing your rights as a tenant.

Particularly relevant at this time of year is the provision of a working heating and hot water system.

If your boiler has stopped working and there is no hot water, you should contact your landlord immediately. It may require just a push of a button to restart the pilot light, but if you think the boiler needs to be repaired, it is the landlord’s responsibility to arrange. Your landlord should tell you when you can expect the repairs to be done, a reasonable time being up to 3 days.

Tenants are entitled to have heating for each occupied room and a boiler for heating the water. The government’s minimum heating recommendation is at least 18°C in sleeping rooms, and 21°C in living rooms, when the temperature outside is minus 1°C, and it should be available at all times.

Your landlord is responsible for any repairs and replacements required under the Landlord and Tenant Act (1985) and overrules any other document or statement.

You should carry on paying rent while you’re waiting. If you don't, you'll get into rent arrears and your landlord might then try to evict you.

If you are not satisfied with the landlord’s response, then contact Legend Solicitors who will assist you in getting your landlord to carry out the required repairs as well as claim the compensation you deserve.

 

Give us a call on 02031301747 or E-Mail us on info@legendsolicitors.org